Welcome to Our Practice

Our physicians provide foot and ankle care in the Tri-County area including: Berkley, Southfield, Royal Oak, Oak Park, and Ferndale.

Drs. Hoffman, B. Kissel, C. Kissel, Schey, Ungar, and Weitzman provide quality, comprehensive foot and ankle care to patients in Berkley and the surrounding communities. Combined, they have over 100 years of experience in podiatry and a genuine concern for patients. In adddition, the NorthPointe Foot & Ankle staff is dedicated to promptly attending to your comfort and care.

This web site provides you with an overview of our practice and the field of podiatry. As you navigate the site, you'll find information about our practice philosophy, physicians, office location, insurance policies, and appointment scheduling procedures. Please browse the site at your convenience and contact us with any questions. You can also schedule an appointment by clicking here.

Should your care require surgical intervention, we are on staff at many area hospitals including:

Surgical Foot Correction - Visit our Educational Video Section


EVENTS:
November 11, 7:30 am - 12:30 pm  Rotary Club of Berkley Pancake Breakfast.   All you can eat.  Tickets at NorthPointe Foot & Ankle Office. $8 adults, $4 kids13 and under.  First Untited Methodist Church, 2820 Twelve Mile Rd, Berkley.
 
November 13 - December 8  Warm Up Your Neighbors: NEW Hat, Glove, Scarve and Sock drive.  Donattions will be distributed to those less forutnate in the community before Christmas.  Drop off donations to NorthPointe Foot & Ankle or to Berkley Senior Center.

Diabetes and Your Feet                                                                                                                                Healthy feet are essential for overall good health, no matter your age, fitness level, or physical challenges. For people with diabetes, however, taking care of their feet is especially vital. More than 60 percent of all non-traumatic lower-limb amputations worldwide are related to complications from the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association.

A 2012 study by the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) indicates Hispanics with diabetes are particularly in danger, because more than 90 percent of those with the disease or at risk for it have never seen a podiatrist as part of their health care.

The leading cause of hospitalization among people with diabetes—regardless of ethnicity—is foot ulcers and infections, but most of those problems are largely preventable. It’s important for those with the disease to receive regular foot exams by a podiatrist.

While ulcers—open sores on the foot—are the most common diabetes-related foot problem, several others are also serious and   prevalent, including neuropathy, skin changes, calluses, poor circulation, and infection. The nerve damage that diabetes causes may mean a person with an ulcer or injury may be unaware of it until it becomes infected. Infection can lead to partial or full amputation of the foot or lower leg. Regular care from a podiatrist can reduce amputation rates up to 80 percent, according to the APMA.

People with diabetes need to inspect their feet daily and be vigilant for warning signs of ulcers, including irritation, redness, cracked or dry skin (especially around the heels), or drainage on their socks.

Although ulcers can occur anywhere on the foot or ankle, they are typically found on pressure points on the foot, like the ball of the foot or bottom of the big toe. If an ulcer is discovered, or other symptoms, a podiatrist should be seen immediately. In many cases, the foot can be saved with early treatment.

In addition to examining feet every day, and keeping blood glucose in the target range, NorthPointe Foot & Ankle podiatrists advise following these foot health tips:

  • Discuss diabetes and the risks with family members. Diabetes can be hereditary, so talk to family members about monitoring blood sugar and foot health.
  • Never go barefoot. Always protect feet with the proper footwear and make sure socks and shoes are comfortable and fit well.
  • Trim toenails straight across, and never cut the cuticles. Seek immediate treatment for ingrown toenails, as they can lead to serious infection.
  • Keep feet elevated while sitting.
  • Wiggle toes and move feet and ankles up and down for five-minute sessions throughout the day.
  • Schedule a Comprehensive Diabetic Foot Exam.  This simple, painless  examination helps diagnose the onset of diabetes and foot related problems due to teh disease.   

Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.)
Commonly referred to as “poor circulation,” Peripheral Arterial Disease (P.A.D.) is the restriction of blood flow in the arteries of the leg. When arteries become narrowed by plaque (the accumulation of cholesterol and other materials on the walls of the arteries), the oxygen-rich blood flowing through the arteries cannot reach the legs and feet.
 
The presence of P.A.D. may be an indication of more widespread arterial disease in the body that can affect the brain, causing stroke, or the heart, causing a heart attack. Most people have no symptoms during the early stages of P.A.D. Often, by the time symptoms are noticed, the arteries are already significantly blocked.
 
Common symptoms of P.A.D. include:
  • Leg pain (cramping) that occurs while walking (intermittent claudication)
  • Leg pain (cramping) that occurs while lying down (rest pain)
  •  Leg numbness or weakness
  • Cold legs or feet
  • Sores that won’t heal on toes, feet, or legs
  • A change in leg color
  • Loss of hair on the feet and legs
  • Changes in toenails—color and thickness
If any of these symptoms are present, it is important to discuss them with your NorthPointe Foot  & Ankle podiatrist. Left untreated, P.A.D. can lead to debilitating and limb-threatening consequences.